Guidelines

What does USACE stand for?

What does USACE stand for?

The United States Army Corps of Engineers
The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) was founded on June 16, 1775, just two days after the Army was established.

What types of programs does the USACE work in today?

USACE realty programs include the Joint Facilities Recruiting Program, the Homeowners Assistance Program, BRAC acquisitions and disposal, and the Defense National Relocation Program. The U.S. Corps of Engineers owns and operates more than 600 dams located throughout the United States.

What is a USACE 408 permit?

Section 408 provides that USACE may grant permission for another party to alter a Civil Works project upon a determination that the alteration proposed will not be injurious to the public interest and will not impair the usefulness of the Civil Works project.

Who does the USACE report to?

the chief of engineers
Three deputy commanding generals (major generals) report to the chief of engineers, who have the following titles: Deputy Commanding General, Deputy Commanding General for Civil and Emergency Operation, and Deputy Commanding General for Military and International Operations.

Is USACE a DoD agency?

USACE is a federal public engineering, design, and management agency under DoD jurisdiction. Its primary mission is related to flood protection, canals, and dams, but it also undertakes public works projects outside the United States.

What is civil works project?

Civil Works projects are implemented and operated for commercial navigation, flood risk management, environmental restoration, hydroelectric power, recreation, and municipal and industrial water supply.

Who runs USACE?

Lieutenant General Scott A. Spellmon
Lieutenant General Scott A. Spellmon assumed duties as the 55th Chief of Engineers and Commanding General of the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) on September 10, 2020 after most recently serving as the USACE Deputy Commanding General for Civil and Emergency Operations.

What is a sapper in the UK Army?

The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is a corps of the British Army. It provides military engineering and other technical support to the British Armed Forces and is headed by the Chief Royal Engineer.

Where are combat engineers stationed?

Combat Engineers are trained at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Fort Leonard Wood is the home of the US Army Engineer Center and School, plus the Engineer Museum, which contains the Engineer Regimental Room. Infantry soldiers are trained at Fort Benning, Georgia.

Is USACE a federal agency?

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